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Why It’s Taking So Long for COVID-19 Vaccines for Under 15 Kids

COVID-19 Kids Temprature Checking

The vaccine was originally given to prevent death associated with pneumonia and the bacteria that causes meningitis. Menactra is not intended for children 15 years of age or less, nor for pregnant women.

Allergen immunotherapy is also known as desensitization, is an important part of treating people who have allergies and asthma. Unlike other types of allergy shots that only temporarily help relieve symptoms, Allergen immunotherapy actually helps to stop these reactions from occurring. The vaccinations are made by injecting small amounts of each allergen into the body over time so it will get used to them and won’t cause such strong allergic reactions when exposed to them again.

U.S. group that can’t get vaccinated

Sanofi Pasteur manufactured 25 million doses of Menactra vaccine by the end of 2015, which is enough to cover approximately 50% of the U.S. population aged 2-10 years old. The company has not yet released any information on potential pricing or availability dates at this time.

By 2020, 10 percent will be sickened by pneumococcus and many will die, according to the U.S Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The drug was approved in adults ages 18–55 in 2005 under the name Menactra (licensed from Novartis) but was later approved for children as young as 9 months old after clinical trials showed that it was safe and effective for kids under 15.

The global market for vaccines targeting children 14 years or younger is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 3.5 percent to reach $14 billion by 2018, according to research firm GlobalData’s latest report “Childhood Vaccines Pipeline Analysis and Market Forecasts.”

The FDA approved the Menveo vaccine for children as young as 9 months old in 2010 based on data showing it was safe and effective for infants.

A new pneumonia vaccine developed with government funding may take longer than expected to make its way onto the market. Novartis, which owns marketing rights for the drug Sanofi Pasteur manufactured called COVID-19, announced that they will not be filing for approval until 2017 instead of 2016. The company says they need more time to test whether or not it is suitable for all age groups under 15 years.

Why it takes longer

The COVID-19 vaccine is not yet on the market because Novartis needs more time to test whether or not it is suitable for use in children under 15. It was being researched up until now, which means it has been nearly 10 years since Novartis first acquired marketing rights.

Update: Novartis announced that they will not be filing for approval until 2017 instead of 2016. The company says they need more time to test whether or not it is suitable for all age groups under 15 years.

Sanofi Pasteur manufactured 25 million doses of Menactra vaccine by the end of 2015, which is enough to cover approximately 50% of the U.S. population aged 2-10 years old. The company has not yet released any information on potential pricing or availability dates at this time.

Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries Ltd.’s (TEVA) PCV13 Prevnar 13 vaccine was approved in February 2014 for children 6 weeks through 4 years old and in January 2012 for older individuals who are at risk for pneumonia diseases. It is also used in people over age 65.

Pfizer Inc.’s Prevnar 13 was approved in December 2014 for use among infants 6 weeks through 5 old who are at the highest risk.

Children more at risk for developing COVID-19 now

Children are more at risk for developing COVID-19 now because they are exposed to more of the illness than they were before. They are exposed to COVID-19 more because the use of antibiotics has become more prevalent, which means that bacteria can develop resistance to them. It has also become easier for people to travel all over the world, which means it is easier for them to bring back bacteria from other countries where diseases are present.

There are two types of pneumococcal vaccines that can protect against the most common strains of bacteria. One vaccine, Prevnar (PCV), was introduced in 2000 and is recommended for newborns, children under 5 years old, adults over 65 years old, and people with certain medical conditions. The other one, Pneumovax (PPSV) was introduced in 1983 and is only approved to use among adults up to age 64 who have specific medical problems like heart disease or sickle cell disease. Prevnar 13 has since replaced Pneumovax 23 which only protected against 23 out of 100 different types of pneumococcal bacteria.

There are 27 companies currently researching PCV vaccines that offer protection from more than 100 different types of pneumococcal bacteria.

Research shows that the Menveo vaccine against seven types of pneumococcal bacteria was safe to use among infants 6 weeks through 14 months old, according to a 2012 clinical trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Menveo is still not approved for children under 15 years old. Sanofi Pasteur manufactured 25 million doses of Menactra vaccine by the end of 2015, which is enough to cover approximately 50% of the U.S. population aged 2-10 years old. The company has not yet released any information on potential pricing or availability dates at this time.

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Daniel Abraham is a content writer who specializes in writing about fitness and health. He only started his journey to physical fitness just over two years ago, but has quickly developed an impressive knowledge of the subject.
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